Ottority

Your Daily Classic Car Registry

Sort by

Login

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Saturday, January 1, 1921

The Ansaldo was an Italian automobile manufactured by the armaments concern Gio. Ansaldo & C. from 1921 to 1931. The company entered car manufacture with an OHC 1,847 cc (112.7 cu in) inline-four engine model which could develop 36 bhp (27 kW) at 3600 rpm. A sports version with 1,981 cc (120.9 cu in) engine was offered, as was a six-cylinder version of 1991 cc; later six-cylinders were offered with engines of 2179 cc.

Among the company's last cars was an OHV straight-8 of 3,532 cc (215.5 cu in). Ansaldos were generally of good quality and modern design, and competed in many races. When Wikov began manufacture in Czechoslovakia in 1928, they built the 1,453 cc (88.7 cu in) Ansaldo Tipo 10.

At the 2015 Antwerp Concours, a Tipo 4A 2 seater with Stevens  & Son Coachwork was present. The car has a 1.580 cc 4 cilinder witha single over head cam. This is one of approximately 25 left. For 50 years this car stayed with its last owner in New zealand and Australia, now it is in the Netherlands.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Wednesday, December 26, 1923

We found this Ansaldo on the web, which was sold for £46,600 (€63,470) inc. premium at the 2011 Beaulieu Autojumble.

The Coachwork was by Carrozzeria Ansaldo, Registration no. SV 9441.

Chassis no.is 6049, Engine no. 6070S

One of Italy's largest engineering groups, Ansaldo needed to find a use for its Turin aero engine factory after WWI and decided to diversify into motor manufacturing. Production of an advanced light car - the Tipo 4 - commenced in 1919. Designed by Ansaldo's chief engineer, Guido Soria, it was powered by an overhead-camshaft four-cylinder engine displacing 1,847cc and featured an American-style central gearchange to the three-speed 'box. In 1923 Ansaldo introduced four-wheel brakes to the range and launched its first six-cylinder model, the 1,990cc 6AN. Ansaldo seemed to have established itself in the motoring marketplace when the group was broken up on Mussolini's orders in 1927, the car division being sold to Macchi. Soria found employment elsewhere but had left designs for two luxury cars on the drawing board, which appeared after he left. Car production fizzled out during the early 1930s, though the Ansaldo name subsequently appeared on Viberti-built trolleybuses.

The car offered here is one of only a tiny handful of surviving six-cylinder Ansaldos retaining their original factory coachwork. The vendor advises us that he knows of one other in New Zealand while another is rumoured to exist in Germany. Post WW2 the car resided in New Zealand until 1978 and then went to a collection in Japan. The Ansaldo was purchased approximately 10 years ago by the current vendor, who reports that it possesses excellent steering and good brakes for a vintage-era car.

A body-off restoration was undertaken circa 2003/2004 when works carried out include a re-spray, rewiring the electrics (using correct cotton braided cabling) and an engine rebuild. The latter involved re-boring the cylinders to 66mm (1mm oversize); fitting new, forged pistons (Bristol 2-litre); fully floating gudgeon pin conversion; lightly regrinding the crankshaft; white metalling the main and big-end bearings; renewing all studs in stainless steel; fitting a new duplex timing chain; reconditioning the oil and water pumps; overhauling the cylinder head and fitting new valves; and refilling the block with anti-freeze. Only 500-or-so miles have been covered since the rebuild and the engine still needs to be run-in. The vendor recommends keeping to below 50mph for the next 500 miles and advises us that the engine uses Castrol R40 castor-based oil. The only modification of note has been the gearbox's conversion to four speeds (from three) using a Riley gear set in the original case (original gears included in sale).

The vendor has many other old cars and does not have sufficient time to devote to them all, hence the decision to sell the Ansaldo, which has seen relatively little use. Described as in generally very good condition, this rare Italian sports-tourer comes with twin tonneau covers, hood, hood bag and an incomplete set of side screens. Accompanying documentation consists of sundry restoration invoices, current road fund licence, MoT to August 2012 and Swansea V5 registration document

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Thursday, September 23, 1926

During a period of raising public interest in mechanical engineering, five brothers took great interest in developing anything with an internal combustion engine. Carlo, Bindo, Alfieri, Ettore and Ernesto were sons of Rodolfo Maserati. They benefited from his expertise in railway engineering and began constructing motorized bicycles as early as 1900.

First onto the motor racing scene was Carlos. After briefly working for Fiat, Carlos worked for Cesare Isotta and Vincenzo Fraschini as a technical director of Isotta Fraschini. Thanks to the help of Carlos, his brother Alfieri was hired by the firm in 1903 followed by Ettore and Bindo. The brothers remained in the company for at least five years until 1907, when Carlos changed to Bianchi and then, in 1910, prematurely died of illness. This left Alfieri to lead the Maserati brothers.

After a racing as mechanic alongside driver Vincenzo Trucco in an Isotta Fraschini Type FE, Alfieri was motivated towards independence in the world of motor sports. His plan was to start his own firm utilizing family talent and cooperation. Unfortunately his plans were halted until the end of world war one. After the war a shop was setup near Bologna to maintain and built racing cars under the name Societa Anomina Officine Alfieri Maserati.

After successfully racing modified Isotta Fraschinis and a couple other cars in the early 1920s, the brothers were offered a deal by Diatto works. Specifically, Diatto wanted Maserati to help race their new Type 20S against competition including the Fiat 804 and Alfa Romeo RL. While working for Diatto, the Maserati brothers developed a supercharged, straight eight engine for the 1925 Two Liter Formula. After a few unsuccessful races, the collaboration between Maserati and Diatto ended.

The First Maserati

Experience and engineering principles used to construct the Diatto cars provided a basis for the first Maserati, the Type 26. The car used many relatively standard designs which kept component failure and escalating costs to a minimum.

The design of the Type 26 consisted of a steel, ladder-type frame supporting a Diatto-like inline-8 and Diatto three-speed transmission. The body covered these elements in a skin of aluminum.

Fitting with the 1926 regulations, the Type 26 had a 1.5 liter engine which was a smaller version of the Diatto two-liter designed a year earlier. Both engines featured crankshaft-driven Roots superchargers, twin overhead camshafts and light alloy blocks. The main upgrades to the Maserati engine included a stronger cast-iron cylinder head, roller-type main bearings and dry-sump lubrication.

Throughout its racing career, the Type 26 was subject to constant evolution which created individual differences on each chassis. By 1927 upgrades the carburetion and engine lubrication were completed. This including swapping the carburetors to run at front of the intake system, before the supercharger, to avoid flooding. By 1928, honeycomb radiators and a smaller, more lightweight chassis were standard.

Type 26 in Racing

Maserati's first motor sport race was over the Sicilian Mountains. This race was of course the Targa Florio were the Type 26 debut was quite successful. Despite the over all victory going to a Bugatti Type 35, Alfieri Maserati drove his car to ninth place, taking a class victory in Grand Prix formula.

After the Targa, two lighter Type 26s were entered in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza. Unfortunately, both cars retired with lubrication and carburetion issues which were rectified for the 1927 season.

For the rest to the season Maserati secured an additional class victory at the Tripoli Grand Prix in North Africa. Since Grand Prix Formula was being dissolved at the end of the year, this meant the 1.5 liter Maserati engine had to be enlarged if it was going to take advantage of the new two liter class. For 1927, a Type 26B was released featuring a two liter engine, having a bore and stroke of 62 x 82 mm.

submitted by Richard Michael Owen

production 10-12

engine Supercharged Inline-8 w/dry Sump Lubrication

position Front Longitudinal

aspiration Roots Compressor w/Twin Memini Super Carbs

valvetrain DOHC, 2 Valves per Cyl

displacement 1492 cc / 91.0 in³

bore 60 mm / 2.36 in

stroke 66 mm / 2.6 in

compression 5.8:1

power 89.5 kw / 120 bhp @ 5300 rpm

specific output 80.43 bhp per litre

bhp/weight 153.85 bhp per tonne

body / frame Aluminum Body over Steel Frame

driven wheels Front Engine

front tires Dunlop 4.75x18

rear tires Dunlop 5.00x18

front brakes Mechanical Drums

f brake size mm / in

rear brakes Mechanical Drums

r brake size mm / in

front wheels F 45.7 x 7.6 cm / 18 x 3 in

rear wheels R 45.7 x 8.3 cm / 18 x 3.25 in

steering Worm Gear

f suspension Leaf Springs w/Friction Dampers

r suspension Leaf Springs w/Friction Dampers

curb weight 780 kg / 1720 lbs

wheelbase 2650 mm / 104.3 in

front track 1340 mm / 52.8 in

rear track 1360 mm / 53.5 in

length 3670 mm / 144.5 in

width 1500 mm / 59.1 in

height 1250 mm / 49.2 in

transmission Diatto 3-Speed Manual

gear ratios :1

top speed ~180.2 kph / 112 mph

source: supercars.net

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Saturday, January 1, 1927

The Amilcar CGS Grand Sport was a popular inter war lightweight sports car, manufactured by the French automobile maker Amilcar between 1923 and 1925. A response to the successful Salmson VAL3 series, the "C Grand Sport" was developed from the Amilcar C. The CGS had a longer, more rigid chassis, and improved brakes in addition to its bigger engine.

Its 1,074cc, 30 bhp, side valve engine with an aluminium head gave it a listed top speed of at least 120 km/h (75 mph), and could be tuned for better performance. Four-wheel brakes were fitted.

A lowered and higher tuned version, the CGSS, the second S standing for surbaisse (lowered), was also made. Around 4,700 of both types were made.

Amilcar built the CGS series from 1921 till 1939. This Coupé “Duval” is a one-off built for Miss Edita Morris. Edita Morris was was a Swedish American writer and political activist, who wrote the famous book “ The flowers of Hiroshima” (New York 1959).

Since 1995 the car is owned by Detlef Kayser, who found the car and restored it during 8 years.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Saturday, January 1, 1927

This is a 1927 BNC Sport with a 2 seater racing body. This is chassis #27041, sold new to Portugal. It raced from 1928 to 1935, is equiped with a Cozette Supercharger.

B.N.C. was established by Lucien Bollack (an engineer who had also worked for Hispano-Suiza) and his financier, banker René Netter, in January 1923. The technical director was Jacques Muller, also known as "Jack". Muller's earlier J.M.K. cyclecar formed the basis of their first car the "DZ".

B.N.C. were a successful maker of cyclecars, winning many rallies albeit not selling very many cars. In the late 1920s, the company tried to penetrate a higher market sector - unfortunately the demand for large passenger cars and for ultra-light racing cars were both low, and Bollack and Netter were forced out of their company in 1928 when the business was acquired by Charles de Ricou, an energetic businessman who by now had a reputation for rescuing financially troubled automobile manufacturing businesses. In the case of B.N.C. his timing was less than perfect, however, in that (like many others) he failed to anticipate the Great Depression, B.N.C. launching the large 8-cylinder engined "Aigle" in October 1929, a few days before the stock market crashes gave notice of a decade of severe contraction and stagnation for the French economy.

Shortly after he had taken over at B.N.C., de Ricou took over two other companies in financial difficulty, Lombard and Rolland-Pilain;[6] Charles de Ricou took a double stand, directly opposite one of the principal entrances of the Grand Palais, at the 25th Paris Motor Show in October 1931, and displayed on it cars from all three of his companies, B.N.C., Lombard and Rolland-Pilain. Models on display included the new B.N.C. 6-cylinder engined 2-litre B.N.C coupé "Vedette ADER".[5] In the event this car was never produced for sale, however.

For 1931 a line of sporty front-wheel drive B.N.C. cars with pneumatic suspension were presented but came to naught. The doors of the firm were shuttered shortly afterwards.

One of B.N.C.'s drivers, André Siréjols, had already been building special bodies for B.N.C. cars. He took over the remaining stock of parts and kept on assembling a trickle of cars into the fifties, usually referred to as "B.N.C. Siréjols". The last of these continuation cars were equipped with Ford's "10 HP" 1172 cc side valve four

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Saturday, January 1, 1927

The Type 38 was produced in 1926 and 1927. It used the 2 L (1991 cc/121 in³) engine from the Type 35A "Tecla". The supercharger from the Type 37A was later fitted, making the Type 38A. Its gearbox and brakes were later used in the Type 40, while its radiator and axles were shared with the Type 43.

385 examples were produced, 39 of which were supercharged 38As.

This car is  Chassis # 38345. It has the 8 cilinder 2 litre, the engine of a Typ49 number 150.  The 4 seater Convertible bodywork was designed by Figoni. The first owner kept the car till 1971, the second one till 2006.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké

Pages