Ottority

Your Daily Classic Car Registry

Sort by

Login

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Brutus's picture
Historic date Sunday, March 30, 1975

Overview complete Lancia Range 1975, including Lancia Beta Coupe, Lancia Stratos, Lancia Fulvia and Lancia A 112 Abarth.


Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Friday, December 30, 1983

In the late 1970s, Mercedes competed in rallying with the big V8-powered Coupés of the R107 Series, mainly the light-weight Mercedes 450 SLC 5.0. Mercedes wished to take the 190 E rallying, and asked British engineering company Cosworth to develop an engine with 320 bhp (239 kW) for the rally car. This project was known as project "WAA' by Cosworth". During this time, the Audi Quattro with its all-wheel drive and turbocharger was launched, making the 2.3-16v appear outclassed. With a continued desire to compete in high-profile motor sport with the 190, and also now an engine to do it with, Mercedes turned to the Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft (DTM) (German Touring Car Championship) motor sport series instead. Cars racing in this championship, however, had to be based on a roadgoing model. Mercedes therefore had to put into series production a 190 fitted with a detuned version of the Cosworth engine.

This high-performance model was known as the 190 E 2.3-16, and debuted at the Frankfurt Auto Show in September 1983, after its reputation had already been established. Three cars, only slightly cosmetically altered, had set three world records in August at the Nardo testing facility in Italy, recording a combined average speed of 154.06 mph (247.94 km/h) over the 50,000 km endurance test, and establishing twelve international endurance records. The Mercedes 190-E Cosworth was also featured on the second episode in series fifteen of the popular car show Top Gear.

The Cosworth engine was based on the M102 four cylinder 2.3-litre 8-valve 136 hp (101 kW) unit already fitted to the 190- and E-Class series. Cosworth developed the cylinder head, "applying knowledge we've learnt from the DFV and BDA." It was made from light alloy using Coscast's unique casting process and brought with it dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, meaning 16 valves total which were developed to be the "largest that could practically be fitted into the combustion chamber".

In roadgoing trim,the 2.3 L 16-valve engine made "185 hp (138 kW) at 6,200 rpm and 174 lb•ft (236 N•m) at 4,500 rpm. The oversquare 95.50 x 80.25 mm bore and stroke dimensions ensuring that it revs easily up to the 7000 rpm redline". Acceleration from 0–100 km/h (62 mph) was less than eight seconds, and the top speed was 230 km/h (143 mph).

US-Specification cars had a slightly reduced compression ratio (9.7:1 instead of 10.5:1), and were rated at 167 hp (125 kW) @ 5800 rpm and 162 lb•ft (220 N•m) @ 4750.

The roadgoing version of the engine was reconfigured with reduced inlet and exhaust port sizes, different camshaft profiles, no dry sump configuration and Bosch K-jetronic replacing the specialised Kugelfischer fuel injection. These changes helped bring power down to the required 185 bhp (138 kW) specification, but still resulted in a "remarkably flexible engine, with a very flat torque curve and a wide power band". The heads for the engines were cast at Cosworth's Coscast foundry in Worcester and sent to Germany to be fitted to the rest of the engine, parts of which were different from the standard 2.3 including light pressed alloy pistons, and rings designed to withstand higher engine speeds, whilst con-rods, bearings and bearing caps were found to be strong enough as standard and left unaltered.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Tuesday, December 30, 1986

The last run limited edition "Brooklands" Green, 280 model, featuring a limited slip differential, full leather Recaro interior and 15 inch versions of the seven spoke 13 inch wheels fitted to the superseded Capri Injection Special. Ford originally intended to make 500 turbo charged vehicles (by Turbo Technics) complete with gold alloy wheels and name it the Capri 500 but a change of production planning meant a name change to Capri 280 as the cars were simply the last models that ran down the production line. A total of 1,038 Capri 280s were built.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Sunday, December 30, 1962

The Alfa Romeo 2600 was produced from 1961 to 1969 as the successor to the Alfa Romeo 2000. The model series initially had three versions: the Spyder manufactured by Carrozzeria Touring, the Berlina coming directly from the factories of Alfa Romeo and the Sprint made by Bertone. Another coupe came along later with the 2600 Zagato and the luxuriously equipped saloon was added with the 2600 OSI. The newly developed 2584 cc.in-line six-cylinder engine was made of aluminium and generated 145 hp. Top speed was 200 kph and 175 kph for the Berlina.

The one-off prototype Alfa Romeo shown here was presented by Pininfarina at the Turin Motor Show and at the Geneva Motor Show in 1962 as a Spider cabriolet, prototipo 621. The car was subsequently converted to a coupe for the Brussels Motor Show in January 1963. It was later discovered in the USA and a restoration reinstated this prototype back to the version presented at the 1963 Brussels Motor Show.

In 2010, Roland D’Ieteren from Belgium entered this exceptional car at the Concorso d’Eleganzia at Villa d’Este.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Friday, December 30, 1966

In 1958, the American Chrysler Corporation pursued an entry into the European motor manufacturing market by buying 15 per cent of the French Simca company's stock from Ford. At that time, however, the dominant shareholder remained Fiat of Turin, and their influence remained distinctively apparent in the engineering and design of Simca cars for several years into the early 1960s. However, in 1963 Chrysler increased its Simca stake to a controlling 64 per cent by purchasing stock from Fiat, subsequently extending that holding to 77 per cent.

Chrysler had no interest in any continuation of the previously successful Simca Abarth and Abarth Simca high-performance car collaboration, which came to a juddering halt. In Turin Carlo Abarth found himself left more or less high and dry, but the supply of basically Simca 1000 chassis floor pans, upon which the sleek and superfast Abarth Simca 1600s and 2000s had been based, left quite a number in stock, as yet unused.

The popular legend is that it was upon these unused Simca platforms that Abarth then founded his 1300cc class Gran Turismo design for 1965 – the OT 1300. Abarth's technical team under Mario Colucci had developed a boxed pressed-steel chassis structure on the modified Simca 1000 floor pan to which allindependent suspension was attached with componentry drawn from the Fiat 850 shelves. The Abarth OT 1300 then emerged, to race for the first time as a prototype in the Sepember, 1965, Nurburgring 500-Kilometre classic.

Driver Klaus Steinmetz hammered the new Coupé home to a fine third-place finish overall and the OT 1300 was up and running into the record books, becoming one of the most successful – and also one of the most distinctive – models that Abarth & C ever produced. The OT 1300's rear-mounted all-Abarth engine was overhung – in best Carlo Abarth-approved style. It was a 4-cylinder unit with twin overhead camshaft cylinder head, using a block with cylinder bore and stroke dimensions of 86mm x 55.5mm to displace 1289cc.

With two valves per cylinder and a 10.5:1 compression ratio, the engine breathed through two twin-choke Weber 45DCOE9 carburettors. Ignition was by two plugs per cylinder, fired by single distributor. Dry-sump lubrication was adopted and the power unit produced a reliable 147bhp at 8,800rpm. This lusty engine, perfected by Abarth's power-unit specialist Luciano Fochi with five main-bearing crankshaft, drove via a five-speed and reverse Abarth transaxle.

Wheelbase length of the OT 1300 was nominally 2015mm, front track 1296mm and rear track 1340mm. It featured moulded glassfibre clamshell-style opening front and rear body sections moulded by Sibona & Basano in Turin, and this pert-nosed Coupé became a familiar sight dominating its class for three consecutive years. Production of the OT 1300 began on May 15 1966 and ended on March 30, 1966, by which time the minimum production number of 50 required by the FIA for homologation as a Gran Turismo model had (allegedly) been achieved.

The most distinctive single characteristic of the OT 1300 Coupé, apart from its huge International success within its class, was its adoption of the Periscopica air-cooling intake on the rear of the cabin roof. Casual onlookers would assume that the periscopelike intake fed intake air into the rear-mounted engine, but this is absolutely not the case. Instead, the water and oil-cooling pipe runs through the cockpit area heated-up the cabin to what was generally considered to be an unacceptable level for endurance racing, and the periscope intake merely blasted cold air down into the cabin to cool the driver himself...

Source : Bonhams.com

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Using the 930 Turbo as a basis, Porsche built the 934 for Group 4 GT racing. It replaced the outgoing Carrera RSR while winning GT Championships in Europe and performing very well in America for Trans Am.

Porsche built the 934 from a standard 930 bodyshell and production rear spoiler, but almost nothing else was left alone.

The suspension was converted to solid mounts and nylon bushings with adjustable anti-roll bars. New brakes from the 917 were fitted along with stronger hubs and BBS center-lock wheels which at 16 inches, were larger than the outgoing the RSR and required more drastic wheel arches.

Inside the was stripped and included an aluminum roll-cage as well as new gauges for fuel and turbo boost levels.

A 120 liter fuel tank filled the front trunk along with a oil tank and battery. The oil tank fed a front mounted oil cooler which was fed from a huge cut-out in the spoiler. Beside these were ducts that led to the rear intercoolers. This system added nearly 45 lbs to the car, but was necessary since an air-to-air intercooler could not fit under the standard engine hood which was mandated by the regulations.

Porsche took the standard 930/75 engine and fitted new pistons while the block, crankshaft and connecting rods were all production parts. Furthermore the standard ignition and mechanical injection system had to be used. With a large KKK turbocharger, around 485 bhp was possible at 1.4 bar of boost.

The first 934 prototype appeared in September of 1975 and it was instantly faster than the outgoing Group 5 Carrera RSR 3.0. This meant almost every team upgraded to the 934 including Kremer and Gelo. As a result the car was very sucessful in the European GT Championship which was won by Toine Hezemans in the Gelo car. The same could be said about the German GT Championship which effectively became a Porsche-only affair.

Later in production Porsche released a 934½ specification which included a larger rear wing and updated 930/73 engine which could produce 600 bhp. These were primarily raced in Group 5 and many were used in America for Trans Am duty under the Vasek Polak banner. They dominated the 1976 season with George Folmer behind the wheel and in 1977 Peter Gregg won the championship. By 1977 the 934 was finally accepted by IMSA and many of those cars were updated to Group 5 spec.

At Le Mans, the 934 was a regular fixture and competed against the Ferrari 512 BB LM. They took class honors in 1977, 1979 and 1981.

Racer Nick Faure recalls getting insights from Ickx: “The single-turbo cars, whether 934 or 935, were a handful with all that turbo lag. Jackie Ickx told me to commit the car to the corner and saw away at the steering wheel to scrub off the speed whilst not lifting your right foot.”

Source : supercars.net

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké