Ottority

Your Daily Classic Car Registry

Sort by

Login

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Brutus's picture
Historic date Sunday, January 3, 2016

This compilation features the Renault 5 Alpine and Turbo, and their rally versions driven by Jean Ragnotti. The Turbo was later replaced by the Turbo 2, which had a less specialised interior, shared with the Alpine Turbo, that cost less to produce.

Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Saturday, January 3, 1998

The 300 Biturbo received the new 24-valve 3.0 liter PRV V6 block in 1998, now with dual turbo. The extra Turbo of the Biturbo delivered 30 Bhp more, to 310 horses, sufficient for a top speed of some 280 km / h and a sprint to 100 km/h in less than five seconds. And despite the fact that the handling, performance and finish with this model were brought to a higher level, only a hundred cars were built of the Atlantique before factory went bankrupt in 2000.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Wednesday, January 3, 1996

In 1996 the design changed when the Atlantique 300 was launched. With approximately the same, excellent chassis as its predecessor, the supercar now looked much more aerodynamic and potent, but still very recognizable as a Venturi. In the Atlantique 300 the same 3.0-liter V6 block served as the 400 GT, only now with a single turbo delivering a power output of 281 hp.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture

The 1994 MVS Venturi 400 GT

Historic date Friday, January 3, 1992

Under the new management Venturi also took serious steps in racing and took part in the FIA GT races with the 400 GTR. A derivative street version, the 400 GT was launched in 1994 in a limited series of 15 pieces on the market. A 3.0-liter midengine V6 with two turbochargers and intercoolers. resulted in an output of 408 horsepower, without turbo lag. The Car weighed less than 1200 kg, reached nearly 300 km/ h and acceleration to 100 km/h was covered in just over 4 seconds. Was the Venturi 260 still looks pretty stylish and civilized, the 400 GT set an enormous aesthetic leap with his wide body and exuberant spoilers. At that time it was the fastest French car ever. Moreover, it was the first supercar with ceramic brakes.. But still it was based on the old Venturi model, which had been on the market for almost ten years.

A limited-edition 400 GTR was built for racing homologation requirements and later used in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Venturi was also briefly involved with the Larrousse Formula One team. The team's 1992 car, which bore the Venturi name, was designed and built by Venturi Larousse UK, a British company formerly known as Fomet 1, which had previously designed the 1991 Fondmetal Formula One cars. The 400 GT remains one of the best performing French cars ever produced, and it is in fact the very first car in the world to have standard carbon brakes. True to that claim, the Atlantique 400 GT with a 408 PS (300 kW; 402 hp) V6 3.0 24v DOHC twin-turbo delivered excellent performance to put it on par with Ferraris of the early 90s. The 400 GT could hit 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.7 seconds and 291 km/h (181 mph) top speed, while the Atlantique 300 biturbo with a 314 PS (231 kW) V6 did 4.9 seconds to 100 km/h (62 mph) and went all the way to 171 mph (275 km/h).

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Tuesday, January 3, 1989

In 1989, there was a gorgeous convertible version appeared, the Venturi Transcup.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture

The 1989 MVS Venturi 260

Historic date Tuesday, January 3, 1989

Just over two hundred pieces of the “210” left the factory in 1989 before the first major changes were presented The main one was the engine. The power of the PRV V6 engine was enlarged to over 260 horsepower. By a larger bore and stroke, the engine became a 2.8 liter, still with a Garrett T3 turbo. That gave a rather brutal turbo lag: up to 3000 RPM nothing happened. Above 3000 rpm the car became a catapult on the boulevard. From 1989 on the MVS brand name got lost and under new ownership the car went further as Venturi 260 through life. He scored very well in several serious tests and here and there the cars was even better as its competitors (like the Lotus Esprit) down on issues such as handling, finishing and everyday usability.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké