Ottority

Your Daily Classic Car Registry

Sort by

Login

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Bruno Hancké's picture

The 1984 Ford RS200

Historic date Tuesday, January 10, 1984

The Ford RS200 is a mid-engined, four-wheel drive sports car that was produced by Ford Europe from 1984 to 1986. The road-going RS200 was based on Ford's Group B rally car and was designed to comply with FIA homologation regulations, which required 200 road legal versions be built. It was first displayed to the public at the Belfast Motor Show.

Following the introduction of the MKIII Escort in 1980, Ford Motorsport set about development of rear-wheel-drive, turbocharged variant of the vehicle that could be entered into competition in Group B rally racing, and dubbed the new vehicle the Escort RS 1700T. A problem-filled development led Ford to abandon the project in frustration in 1983, leaving them without a new vehicle to enter into Group B. Not wanting to abandon Group B or simply "write off" the cost of developing the failed 1700T, executives decided to make use of the lessons learned developing that vehicle in preparing a new, purpose-built rally car. In addition, Ford executives became adamant that the new vehicle feature four-wheel-drive, an addition they felt would be necessary to allow it the ability to compete properly with four-wheel-drive models from Peugeot and Audi.

The new vehicle was a unique design, featuring a plastic/fiberglass composite body designed by Ghia, a mid-mounted engine and four-wheel drive. The cars were built on behalf of Ford by another company well known for its expertise in producing fibreglass bodies - Reliant. To aid weight distribution, designers mounted the transmission at the front of the car, but this required that power from the mid mounted engine go first up to the front wheels and then be run back again to the rear, creating a complex drive train setup. The chassis was designed by former Formula One designer Tony Southgate, and Ford's John Wheeler, a former F1 engineer, aided in early development. A double wishbone suspension setup with twin dampers on all four wheels aided handling and helped give the car what was often regarded as being the best balanced platform of any of the RS200's contemporary competitors. Such was the rush to complete the RS200, the Ford parts bin was extensively raided - the front windscreen and rear lights were identical to those of the early Sierra, for example, while the side windows were cut-down Sierra items.

Power came from a 1.8 litre, single turbocharged Ford/Cosworth "BDT" engine producing 250 horsepower (190 kW) in road-going trim, and between 350 and 450 horsepower (340 kW) in racing trim; upgrade kits were available for road-going versions to boost power output to over 300 horsepower (220 kW). Although the RS had the balance and poise necessary to be competitive, its power-to-weight ratio was poor by comparison, and its engine produced notorious low-RPM lag, making it difficult to drive and ultimately less competitive. Factory driver Kalle Grundel's third-place finish at the 1986 WRC Rally of Sweden represented the vehicle's best-ever finish in Group B rallying competition, although the model did see limited success outside of the ultra-competitive Group B class. However, only one event later, at the Rally de Portugal, a Ford RS200 was involved in one of the most dramatic accidents in WRC history, claiming the lives of 3 spectators and injuring many others. Another Ford RS200 was crashed by Swiss Formula One driver Marc Surer against a tree during the 1986 Hessen-Rallye in Germany, killing his co-driver and friend Michel Wyder instantly.

The accident at Rally Portugal set off a chain reaction and the RS200 became obsolete after only one full year of competition as the FIA, the governing board, which at the time controlled WRC rally racing, abolished Group B after the 1986 season. For 1987, Ford had planned to introduce an "Evolution" variant of the RS200, featuring a development of the BDT engine (called BDT-E) displacing 2137 cc, developed by Briton Brian Hart. Power figures for the engine vary quite a bit from source to source, depending on the mechanical setup e.g. boost levels, power output ranges from as "little" as 550 horsepower (410 kW) to as high as 815 horsepower (608 kW); it has been said that the most powerful Evolution models can accelerate from 0 to 60 miles per hour (97 km/h) in just over 2 seconds, depending on gearing. Upgraded brakes and suspension components were part of the package as well. The ban on Group B racing effectively forced the E2 model into stillbirth; however, more than one dozen of them were successfully run from August 1986 till October 1992 in the FIA European Championships for Rallycross Drivers events all over Europe, and Norwegian Martin Schanche claimed the 1991 European Rallycross title with a Ford RS200 E2 that produced over 650 bhp (480 kW).

One RS200 found its way in circuit racing originated as a road car; it was converted to IMSA GTO specification powered by a 750+ BHP 2.0 litre turbo BDTE Cosworth Evolution engine. Competing against the numerous factory backed teams such as Mazda, Mercury and Nissan, with their newly built spaceframe specials, despite being a privateer, the car never achieved any real success to be a serious contender and was kept by the original owner. A parts car was built in England and later used to compete in the Unlimited category at the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, where it was driven by Swede Stig Blomqvist in 2001, 2002 and 2004 and in 2009 by former British Rallycross Champion Mark Rennison.

FIA homologation rules for Group B required the construction of at least 200 road-legal vehicles, and Ford constructed these 200 units with spare parts for another 20+ units put aside for the racing teams. Those chassis and spare parts were later also used to build a couple of non-genuine, so-called bitsa cars.

A total of 24 of the 200 original cars were reportedly later converted to the so-called "Evolution" models, mostly marked by their owners as "E" or "E2" types. Ford's first intention was to mark the FIA-required 20 "Evo" cars as series numbers 201 to 220 but as this was actually not necessary according to the FIA rules they later kept their original series numbers (e.g. 201 = 012, 202 = 146, 203 = 174 et cetera).

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Thursday, January 10, 1963

The original TZ, currently sometimes referenced as TZ1 to differ from later TZ2, was developed in together with Autodelta, a company led by Ex-Ferrari engineer Carlo Chiti. It featured a 1,570 cc twin cam engine and other mechanical components shared with the Alfa Romeo Giulia and carried a 105 series chassis number, but was a purpose built sports racing car, with a tubular spaceframe chassis, light all-aluminium bodywork, disc brakes and independent suspension. The result was a lightweight coupé of only 650 kilograms (1,430 lb) and top speed of 134 miles per hour (216 km/h). The TZ was built both for street and racing trim. The engine was a 1,570 cc straight-4 DOHC developing 112 bhp (82 kW) at 6500 rpm in road trim and with the latest racing versions the engine produced up to 160 brake horsepower (120 kW). Alfa's twin-spark cylinder head, as also used in the GTA, contributed to the speed of the TZ; the standard Giulia alloy block with wet steel liners was installed at an angle under the hood of the TZ to improve airflow.

Aiding the TZ in its quest for performance was the treatment of the rear bodywork. Incorporating the research of Dr. Wunibald Kamm, the TZ used a style called "coda tronca" in Italian, meaning "short tail.", otherwise known as the Kamm tail. The principle is that unless you are willing to incorporate an aircraft-like extended tail (not practical for an automobile), there is surprisingly little, if any, increase in drag and a marked decrease in lift or even some downforce by simply chopping off a portion of the tail. Zagato had previously proved the success of this tail treatment in their "coda tronca" Sprint Zagato sports-racing cars, and it was a natural evolution to adapt this to the Giulia TZ.

The car debuted at the 1963 FISA Monza Cup, where TZs took the first four places in the prototype category. At the beginning of 1964 the TZ was homologated (100 units were needed for homologation) to the Gran Turismo category. After homologation it started to take more class wins in Europe and North-America. Of the first TZ, 112 units were built between 1963 and 1965.

Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké
Brutus's picture
Historic date Thursday, June 5, 2014

Top Gear's 'fastest' car as new weapon to deter speeding motorists for the somerset Police.

It already holds the record for the quickest lap round the Top Gear track but  the Ariel Atom has become the world’s fastest panda car.

Avon and Somerset police force has taken delivery of one of the cars which has been painted in the force livery and fitted with special aerodynamic blue lights.

The vehicle, which looks more like a Formula One racing machine, rather than traditional road car, is thought to be the quickest police car in the world, able to outrun the Lamborghini Gallardo LP560-4 Polizia used by Italian officers, the Audi R8 driven by German police, and the Ferrari FF used in Dubai.

Avon and Somerset Police borrowed the Atom from local manufacturer Ariel for the summer while it promotes a new road safety campaign aimed at slowing down speeding motorcyclists.

It is hoped the eye-catching machine will dissuade bikers from riding dangerously as it is displayed at promotional events across the south west.

Andy Parsons, a Roads Policing Sergeant, who is involved in the project said: “I am really excited that Ariel has joined with us to bring Project SAFER RIDER to fruition, and I hope that the use of the Ariel PL1 with have a positive impact to promote Road Safety.

“To be safe, rider and machine need to work in harmony. When this happens it feels immediately right. When it doesn't, things go wrong. Too many injuries and deaths are the result of rider error.”

Simon Saunders, Director of Ariel said: “Our business is about going fast, very fast, but there is a time and a place.

“The Atom is designed to be driven to a racetrack, where you can drive to your limits in safety and in a professional environment designed for the purpose. The road really isn't the place to explore your or your vehicle's limits.”

Motorcyclists are currently 35 times more likely to be killed in a road collision.

While the car, which weighs just 612kg, is capable of keeping up with many high power road bikes, there are no plans to use it in operational police duties.

source : The Telegraph


Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
Historic date Friday, May 9, 1975

Thinking about painting your car ?

BMW hired world's most famous artist to do it with their cars.

BMW made from 1975 untill now 16 unique art cars.

Enjoy the movie about " the making of art cars"

Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
Historic date Monday, June 9, 1986

“Drivable museums would be great. This car is a dream come true for me,” gushed Rauschenberg after the presentation of his Art Car in New York. This BMW 635CSi was the sixth Art Car, yet was the first to have its bodywork decorated with photographic material. The right side bears the image of an Ingres painting. The left hand side of the bodywork is adorned with one of Bronzino’s works, surrounded by Rauschenberg’s own pictures of swamp grass in the Everglades – the hub caps have been painted with images of ancient decorative plates. Rauschenberg must have been pleased with the results as he used the motifs on this Art Car for a subsequent work of art a couple of years later.

Born in 1925 in Port Author, Texas, Rauschenberg counts as one of the the pioneers of American pop art. After studying art in the USA and Europe, he joined the “Art Students League” in 1949 and began designing layouts and costumes for theaters all over the world.

There is one major difference between the BMW 635CSi decorated by Robert Rauschenberg in 1986 and the BMW Art Cars of the 1970s: it is not a racing car, but a normal production car.

Robert Rauschenberg’s Art Car made its first appearance in 1986 at the BMW Gallery in New York. It rounded off the BMW series of American pop art automobiles. At the end of 1988 the Rauschenberg Art Car had its European premiere, and has since been on display throughout the world.

Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Brutus's picture
By Brutus
Bruno Hancké's picture
Historic date Monday, January 9, 1995

Have you ever experienced that when you look for a specific concept car on Google you find absolutely nothing? Sorry for the quality of the picture but this is the only one I could find about the car, and it was in the analogue world.

What is this now already 20 year old car? Is it a Volkswagen Sharan with some tuning parts, red painted brake callipers and some nice Cup rims? Not really.

In 1995 Wendelin Wiedeking is the CEO of Porsche for two years already. Production is about 17.800 cars per year. The Boxster is on its way and he’s desperately looking for expansion. Wiedeking turns towards Volkswagen for further joint development, as with Audi and the RS2. The result is the creation of Porsche RS 1 Varera based on the Volkswagen Sharan. The Van had 7 seats, 4 wheel drive but had no terrain ambitions yet. It was created to show the board of Volkswagen and Porsche the possibilities of the joint development of a big SUV. Which happened, was called the Colorado project and was the basis of the Volkswagen Touareg and Porsche Cayenne.

Varera means to us the combination of the word “Van” and “Carrera”, no?

It has Wolfburgs licensed plates, but even if we look for Volkswagen Varera no information is available. Who knows more about this concept car?


Bruno Hancké's picture
By Bruno Hancké