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Historic date Sunday, January 31, 2016

Color production list:

COLOR PAINT CODE TOTAL PRODUCTION (WITH CHASSIS NUMBERS FOR RARE COLORS)

White (colorcode 206)  :  163   road cars + 43 Procars

Dark Blue (colorcode 207)  : 58 road cars + 2 Procars

Red (colorcode 208) :  71 road cars + 1 Procar

Orange (colorcode 209) :  98 road cars + 1 Procar

Black (colorcode 210) :  3 road cars (4301292, 4301324, 4301326)

Grey (colorcode 211) :  4 road cars (4301043, 4301217, 4301218*, 4301291) *for Jochen Neerpasch

Silver metallic (color code 060) :  2 road cars (4301220*, 4301424) * for Bernie Ecclestone

Unpainted (primer only) 7 Procars

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Historic date Wednesday, January 31, 1979

In keeping with Andy Warhol’s view of art, a car as a rolling work of art is more typical than unusual. Anybody who declares soup cans to be a work of art or suggest closing a whole department store and keeping it as a museum for posterity must be unable to sense any conflict between functional technology and free artistic composition. The studio therefore became a “factory,” and the dichotomy between sophisticated art and everyday life was virtually eliminated.

“I adore the car, it’s much better than a work of art.”

— Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol set about work in an equally unabashed manner after being commissioned to transform a BMW M1 into a BMW Art Car as he thought best. All the other artists who had previously decorated BMW racing cars had done so by painting a draft version on a scaled-down model; this was then transposed to the actual car by assistants under the artist’s supervision. Warhol, however, was the first to paint everything himself. By transferring his ideas to the car in this spontaneous and direct manner, he could clearly stamp his own character on it.

The first and only time this rolling work of art took part in a race was at the Le Mans 24-Hour Race in 1979. It was driven by Manfred Winkelhock from the Federal Republic of Germany and the Frenchman Herve Poulain and Marcel Mignot. They finished sixth overall and second in their class.


About the artist :

The name Andy Warhol is nowadays almost synonymous with pop art. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA) in 1928, he studied from 1945 to 1949 at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, and immediately after this started a career as a successful graphic artist in the advertising sector.

His work went on display as early as 1952 in New York. In 1956 he received the coveted “Art Directors Club Award.” At his legendary “Factory,” at which he employed a whole team of workers, classic art concepts were negated and overturned in an unprecedented manner.

His “mass productions” of prominent faces became well known, as well as painted trivialities such as soup tins and Coca-Cola bottles. Warhol died in 1987 in New York. Two years after his death, the Museum of Modern Art dedicated a full retrospective exhibition to him.

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Historic date Thursday, January 30, 1986

Reliant (based in Tamworth, UK) made more than just the Robin, Kitten and the (nice)Scimitar! Due to the long history of working with composite bodies and the skill of the work and engineer force, Ford motorsport charged them with the task of building their planned Group B monstarr, The RS 200. 200 homoglation specials of the car they planned to blitz the group B scene with, had to be built to meet the regulations of the time.

Due to the fact Richard Grinham lives in Tamworth and his neighbour who  worked for reliant, he did receive  some real fantastic production information.  His neighbour was a line engineer on the full production run of (road) RS200's and he happened to have a camera to hand!  The following pictures were all taken over the production run from the start to the very end and show some !

Special tanks to :

Pictures taken by  Richard Grinham

Midlands,  United Kingdom 

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Historic date Saturday, January 30, 2016

The Ford RS 200 was an all-wheel drive car built specifically for rallying in the Group B category, and with it, Ford aimed to beat Audi's Quattro and once more become the dominant force in rallying they had been with the Escort. The new car had a fibreglass body, built by Reliant, and it was powered by a turbocharged 1.8 litre engine built by Cosworth, that generated in excess of 400 bhp in race trim. It never had chance to gain the laurels it was aimed for, however, as in 1986, the FIA abolished Group B rally cars, owing the danger they posed both to spectators and competitors. This film shows an early example in the hands of Swedish rally ace

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Historic date Tuesday, January 8, 2013

THE PORSCHE PANAMERA TURBO CAMERA CAR

While most movies don’t cause the viewer to think about camera angles, lighting or color tone, there are some with sequences and scenes that leave you wondering, “How the hell did they shoot that?” This is how the hell: Chase Car Inc.

Originally, the camera car world was full of big trucks with camera and operator platforms bolted onto their fronts, giving the whole rig a massive underbite look. As top-mounted jibs and gyros became popular — due to their lightness, central balance and ability to shoot 360 degrees — most in the industry moved to a roof-mounted servo crane, often strapped onto a Mercedes-Benz ML55.

After years of experience in fabrication and building camera cars for other people, Jon and Marshall Chabot started Chase Car Inc. Like most of the industry, they too had the ML55, but the car had some issues: the shocks wore out quickly, and they needed more horsepower. After some searching, they found the auto-leveling air suspension, wide stance and massive engine of the Porsche Cayenne ideal for mounting their 800-lb jib. They weren’t alone, either. In fact, the Cayenne became the go-to car for high speed chase sequences, winding road car commercials and anything in between.

As demand increased for this production “tool”, the market began filling with souped-up SUVs and gyroed camera mechanisms. Marshall and Jon were just another girl at the dance; they needed a new competitive advantage. When Jon spotted the Panamera Turbo, he instantly knew it would be their next car. Though Porsche purists cried “blasphemy” at the new model, Jon saw the advantages of 2+2 seating, four doors, a 500 horsepower 4.8-liter twin turbo and AWD. Plus, the very thing auto journalists chided the Panamera for, its bulbous roofline, was the ideal set up for having two adults in the back seat (necessary for shooting); the hatchback would give the crane operator — after some WWII-style gunner-inspired fabrication work — a place to sit and clearly view his crane.

Jon was right. Amazingly, the Panamera is an out of the box, ready to go, plug-and-play camera car. Sure, Chase Car Inc. added a black matte wrap, black-out covers for the lights and did their own wiring and installation of the five HD monitors on the inside, the aforementioned operator canopy, and some headsets so the driver, director, assistant camera (AC), director of photography (DP) and crane operator can all make the magic happen. But that’s all. No messing with the suspension, gearbox, engine, frame, or anything else.

The team of five, plus the car, the equipment, a camera and of course the 850-pound Scorpio crane with its internal gyro and three camera gyros bring the weight to about 3 tons and the value to about a million bucks — which is exactly what actors look like when these guys’ wheels and cameras start rolling.

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Historic date Friday, August 24, 1979

Jean Claude Rude was an ambitious man, back in 1979 the French cyclist wanted to break the world bicycle speed record. In order to become the world’s fastest on bike, he had to go faster than his fellow countryman José Meiffret who had set the record at an impressive 204.7km/h  in 1962. This amazing speed was achieved on the German Autobahn, presumably closed for other traffic, near Freiburg where Meiffret was riding in the slipstream of a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL.

This form of cycling is known as motor-paced racing. The cyclist follows as close as he can to profit from the slipstream of his pacer, which could either be a car or motorcycle. The slipstream created by the pacer increases speed and endurance of the cyclist, allowing him to reach speeds normally associated with sports cars. 

 Jean Claude Rude had set his sight on a speed of 240km/h, so he needed a powerful sports car capable of reaching those speeds. Rude contacted Porsche, who were willing to help him. The Germans modified a 935, the successful racing car with an enormous amount of power up to 800 horsepower, which dominated endurance racing in those days. The Porsche 935 received an odd-looking rear end designed to reduce drag for the following Jean Claude.

He received more support from the Germans when he was allowed to pedal himself to a new world record at Ehra-Lessien, Volkswagen’s test track near Wolfsburg. Built during the Cold War, the location of this track was chosen because it was in a no-fly zone near the East German border. But more important, Ehra-Lessien has an unbroken straight nine kilometers in length. In fact, the straight is so long, that if you stood on one side of the straight, you wouldn’t be able to see the other end due to the curvature of the Earth. This is also the straight where the top speed of the Bugatti Veyron and the McLaren F1 were recorded, including James May’s run. And this was the straight where Jean Claude would break the world bicycle speed record.

The Porsche 935 was driven by Henri Pescarolo. The bearded Frenchman is nowadays known for his own team which competes in endurance racing, but in those days he was still active as a racing driver. The redesigned rear of the Porsche affected its drivability, the 935 was found to be particularly unstable. To make matters even worse, the Porsche 935 featured a large turbocharger which caused turbo lag followed shortly by a fireball spitting from the exhaust. The latter issue was solved by piping the exhaust to the side of the car, but the turbo lag remained troubling.

Jean Claude Rude needed to stay in the slipstream, not only to ‘get a tow’ from the car in front but also to be protected from the ‘wall of air’. Air resistance is by far the greatest force opposing the forward motion of the cyclist, but it can be dramatically reduced by riding in the slipstream. At high speeds, air resistance has a tremendous effect. The faster you are moving, the more frequently and harder you’ll collide with the molecules in the air. It’s these collisions that create air resistance. More than the length of a bicycle and the benefit of slipstream disappears, this explains why the cyclist needed to get so close. If Pescarolo didn’t accelerate smoothly, which was tricky due to the turbo lag than Jean Claude would collide with a wall of air which would undoubtedly knock him down.

Everything went well until they reached a speed of 160km/h  when suddenly Jean Claude’s rear tire exploded and was torn from the wheel. Remarkably, he managed to prevent a crash and came to a standstill without any injuries or whatsoever. Disappointed with the failed record attempt, but nevertheless happy to be still alive, Jean Claude ordered Michelin to build new and better tyres for a second attempt. Unfortunately a new record run never happened.

Jean Claude started an investigation on his own to experience the effect of a sudden increase in air resistance, which would occur if he would drop out of the Porsche’s slipstream. He decided that the best way to experience the wall of air was to cycle alongside a railway track and to feel the air displaced by an oncoming train. Instead of being hit by a wall of air, Jean Claude Rude was apparently hit by the train. Ironically a quite rude ending for Rude.




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