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The 2016 Porsche 991 R

Historic date Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Limited special model with naturally aspirated engine and manual transmission

Wolf in sheep's clothing – the new Porsche 911 R

Stuttgart. With its new 911 R, Porsche is unveiling a puristic sports car in classical design at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show. Its 368 kW (500 hp) four-litre naturally aspirated flat engine and six-speed sports transmission places the 911 R firmly in the tradition of its historic role model: a road-homologated racing car from 1967. Produced as part of a limited production series, the 911 R (R for Racing) performed in rallies, in the Targa Florio and in world record runs. Like its legendary predecessor, the new 911 R relies on systematic lightweight construction, maximum performance and an unfiltered driving experience: this special limited-edition model of 991 units has an overall weight of 1,370 kilograms and is currently the lightest version of the 911. With the high-revving six-cylinder naturally aspirated engine and manual sports transmission, Porsche is once again displaying its commitment to especially emotional high-performance sports cars. Developed in the motorsport workshop, the 911 R extends the spectrum of high-performance naturally aspirated engines alongside the motor racing models 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS.

At work in the rear of the 911 R is the six-cylinder flat engine with a displacement of four litres, familiar from the 911 GT3 RS. The racing engine delivers 500 hp at 8,250 rpm and generates 460 Nm at a speed of 6,250 rpm. From a standing start, the rear-engined car breaks through the 100 km/h barrier in 3.8 seconds. In keeping with the puristic character of the vehicle, the 911 with its lightweight design is available exclusively with a six-speed sports transmission. Short gearshift travel underlines the active driving experience. The forward thrust of the 911 R continues to a speed of 323 km/h. Combined fuel consumption in the NEDC is 13.3 l/100 km.

A thoroughbred driving machine: technology from the race track

The 911 R could almost have been made for tight corners. The specially tuned standard rear-axle steering guarantees especially direct turn-in characteristics and precise handling while maintaining high stability. The mechanical rear differential lock builds up maximum traction. Ensuring the greatest possible deceleration is the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) as a standard feature. It measures a generous 410 millimetres on the front axle and 390 millimetres on the rear. Ultra High Performance Tyres of size 245 millimetres at the front and 305 millimetres at the rear are responsible for contact to the road. They are mounted on forged 20-inch lightweight wheels with central lock in matt aluminium.

Motorsport development has specially adapted the control systems of the Porsche Stability Management (PSM) for the 911 R. A double-declutch function activated by pressing a button for perfect gearshifts when changing down is also part of the repertoire of the 911 R as is the optional single-mass flywheel. The result is a significant improvement in spontaneity and high-revving dynamics of the engine. For unrestricted practicality in everyday use, a lift system can also be ordered: it raises ground clearance of the front axle by approximately 30 millimetres at the touch of a button.

With its overall weight of 1,370 kilograms, the 911 R undercuts the 911 GT3 RS by 50 kilograms. Bonnet and wings are made of carbon and the roof of magnesium. This reduces the centre of gravity for the vehicle. Rear windscreen and rear side windows consist of lightweight plastic. Additional factors are the reduced insulation in the interior and the omission of a rear bench seat. The optional air conditioning system and the radio including audio system also fell victim to the slimming cure.

Wolf in sheep's clothing: classic 911 look with GT motor racing technology

From the exterior, the 911 R gives a reserved impression. At first sight, the body resembles that of the Carrera. Merely the nose and rear body familiar from the 911 GT3 hint at the birthplace of the 911 R: namely the motorsport department in Flacht. In technical terms therefore, the 911 R has a lot to show under the bonnet: the drive technology comes from the 911 GT3 RS. All the lightweight components of the body and the complete chassis originate from the 911 GT3. However, with a view to road use, the body manages without the fixed rear wing. Instead, a retractable rear spoiler, familiar from the Carrera models, and a rear underbody diffuser specific to R models provide the necessary downforce. Front and rear apron come from the 911 GT3. The sports exhaust system consists of the lightweight construction material titanium. A redesigned spoiler lip is installed at the front. Porsche logos on the sides of the vehicle and continuous colour stripes in red or green over the entire mid-section of the vehicle show the relationship to its legendary predecessor.

The driver sits in a carbon full bucket seat with fabric centre panels in Pepita tartan design, recalling the first 911 in the 1960s. An “R-specific” GT sport steering wheel with a diameter of 360 millimetres receives steering commands from the driver. Gearshifts take place in traditional manner via an R-specific short gearshift lever and the clutch pedal. Carbon trim strips in the interior with an embedded aluminium badge on the front passenger's side indicate the limited number of the 911 R. A typical feature of GT vehicles are the pull straps as door openers.

Launch and prices

Orders for the 911 R can be placed as of now. In Germany it will be in the showrooms as of May. Inclusive of value added tax and country-specific features, it costs 189,544 euros.

Porsche 911 R: urban fuel consumption 20.1 l/100 km; extra-urban 9.3 l/100 km; combined 13.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 308 g/km; efficiency class (Germany): G.

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Brutus's picture
Historic date Sunday, January 31, 2016

The behind the scenes look at the brand new Porsche Panamera Turbo Camera Crane car by Chase Car Inc.

In this behind the scenes featurette, we go through how we conceived the car, its unique features, what it can do.

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Historic date Sunday, January 31, 2016

Very nice and funny Opel Commercial.

The second generation Opel Ascona B was presented in August 1975 at the Frankfurt Motor Show. It was available as a two or four-door saloon. There were related two and three-door coupé models in the Opel Manta range. There was no estate body available.

In January 1979 the street legal version of the Ascona 400 with 2.4-liter engine (16 valves, 144 PS) appeared

Over 1.2 million Ascona B units were produced worldwide until August 1981. The two miliionth Ascona was an Ascona B, built in April 1980, and the one millionth Ascona sold in Germany was registered in July of that same year


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Historic date Friday, January 29, 2016

Lot 233

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster

Chassis no. WP0EB0911KS173142

Engine no. 64K05632

Gearbox no. 1K03625

Sold for $154,000

217 bhp, 3,165 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with Bosch electronic fuel injection, five-speed G50 manual transmission, independent front suspension with MacPherson struts, lower A-arms, torsion bars, and an anti-roll bar, independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, transverse torsion bars, tubular shock absorbers, and an anti-roll bar, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in.

•One of only 823 US-specification Speedsters built for 1989

•Two registered owners from new; just over 20,000 miles recorded

•Matching numbers; Porsche Certificate of Authenticity included

Completed June 6, 1989, this example spent most of its life in southern California, having been imported by its first owner, who picked up the car at the factory under Porsche’s Tourist Delivery program. It was delivered in the popular color of Guards Red with a black partial leather interior and was factory-equipped with air conditioning, sport seats with electric height adjustment, a short shifter, a Blaupunkt Charleston stereo, and a security system.

On June 8, 2000, with its odometer reading 14,777 miles, the car was sold by Porsche of Newport Beach to who is believed to be the car’s second owners, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Salvi of Trabuco Canyon, California. Mr. Salvi immediately had the car serviced and all lubricants replaced by marque specialist Andial Road and Racing in Santa Ana, and, later in his ownership, he replaced the factory stereo with a Kenwood unit in late 2000. In August 2004, showing 18,972 miles, the car was returned to Andial for new hood shocks, new rear shock absorbers, new steering column bushings, a new battery, and other items. The Salvis retained the car until 2014.

Today, this spectacular Carrera Speedster presents as almost new, having recorded just over 20,000 miles, and is in wonderful condition. It is offered with its factory Certificate of Authenticity, tool roll, original collapsible spare, jack, books, service invoices, and clean CARFAX report. Both the fuel injection and air conditioning were recently serviced.

One of the most fiercely desirable modern Porsches, a Carrera Speedster belongs in any performance enthusiast’s collection. This is certainly one of the finest available.

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Historic date Friday, January 29, 2016

Lot 131

1978 BMW M1

Chassis no. 4301011

Engine no. M88-214

Sold for $300,000


•One of 399 road-going examples

•Believed to have been used as a press vehicle for BMW

•Rare full-leather interior; fitted with correct alloy wheels with new tires

The M1 was the first of the now-famous M-cars from BMW’s Motorsport Division as well as the first production mid-engine BMW. In revised form, the M1’s 24-valve twin-cam six powered the late-’80s M5 sedan and M6 coupe, beginning a legacy of many memorable M cars to come.

The motivation to build the M1 came from racing and a set of regulations prompted by the new Group Five in 1976. BMW found its aging CSLs losing against Porsche’s tremendous new 935, and to beat Porsche, BMW needed a mid-engined chassis to fit its twin-cam 3.5-liter six-cylinder engine. There was only one problem; it needed to build 400 copies in order to homologate the car for the series. Not having room or the time to produce cars in such low volume in Munich, BMW’s Motorsport division, headed by Jochen Neespach, contacted Lamborghini for help in building the proposed car, known internally as E26.

Styling was courtesy of Giorgetto Giugiaro’s Ital Design, the firm taking its inspiration from Paul Bracq’s 1972 BMW Turbo, a flamboyantly designed gullwing showcase for passive safety technology constructed by Michelotti. Road cars were equipped with BMW’s 277-horsepower M88 six-cylinder engine, which featured a twin-cam head with chain drive, four valves per cylinder, a forged alloy crank, Kugelfischer-Bosch Indirect fuel injection, and an electronic ignition by Marelli—pretty serious hardware for the mid-’70s.

Shortly after the project was green lighted, the problems and delays began. Lamborghini’s already precarious financial situation worsened, and despite seven prototypes having been constructed, BMW took over control of the project in April 1978. Construction was farmed out to two Italian firms: Marchesi for the multi-tube chassis and Transformazione Italiana Resina for the fiberglass body. Final assembly moved to Baur, the German coachbuilder that had a long history with BMW.

The M1 was officially introduced at the Paris Salon in October 1978, but BMW quickly learned that its new M1 did not meet the requirements of the new Group Five regulations, requiring 400 cars to be sold to the public prior to a racing version run on any track. Production delays meant that the new M1 was not homologated until 1981, by which time GT racing had moved on and the M1 was no longer deemed competitive. It was a race car without a series.

The 1979/1980 Procar series was announced, sort of a European International Race of Champions, staged before major Grand Prix events. In it, F1 drivers competed against each other in identically prepared M1s in a pre-race show. The series was not without its controversies. The first five Grand Prix qualifying drivers were required to participate in the Procar race, like it or not. The agreement between F1’s Bernie Ecclestone and BMW caused problems with Ferrari and other teams, too, causing the Procar series to last just one season. In the end, BMW built 450 M1s, of which about 50 were pure racing machines while the others were fully equipped road cars.

This M1, finished in rare Dark Metallic Blue, is listed on the M1 Registry as a press vehicle used by BMW for promotions and displays. It is equipped with a rare, full black leather interior, as compared to the cloth and leather combination used in most all other M1s. It was completed at Baur on December 21, 1978, and following its duties with BMW, it has resided in California since 1981. It has been in the stewardship of a single collector for the last 25 years, and the odometer shows less than 25,000, though the original engine is noted to have been replaced. The car has been federalized for use in the United States, necessitating the relocation of the fuel fillers inboard, whereby the original fillers have been closed off. It is likely that the original speedometer odometer (reading in kilometers) was replaced at the time the car was federalized. In addition, it is fitted with new tires on correct factory wheels, along with the correct spare, tool kit, and copy of the owner’s manual. An aftermarket AM/FM Stereo radio with cassette has been fitted.

Despite the adversities of its gestation, M1s are without question among the most collectable of BMWs. In addition, they are considered to be highly civilized compared to the supercars of their era and are known for their vice-free handling, high cornering grip, and excellent stopping power. Add to that the reliability and power of BMW’s inline six-cylinder engine and lavish level of equipment by the standards of the day—air conditioning, power windows, power brakes and Recaro seats—and it is no wonder that the M1 is revered by collectors.

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Historic date Friday, January 29, 2016


Lot 104

1962 APAL-Porsche 1600 GT Coupe

Chassis no. 40172003

Engine no. 66106

Gearbox no. 34248

Sold for $88,000

60 bhp, 1,582 cc OHV air-cooled horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine with dual Solex downdraft carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in.

•One of about 150 coupes produced by APAL in Belgium

•Fitted with Porsche 356 running gear

•Comprehensively restored

•One of only a few known in the US

•Unique vintage race and rally potential

A must-have for any collector of Porsches and its many interesting variants, this APAL (Application Polyester Armé de Liège) coupe appears at first glimpse to be a different version of the Porsche 356 Abarth Carrera, but in reality, it is a lightweight fiberglass-bodied coupe built atop a strengthened Volkswagen floorpan, and there is a lot of Porsche underneath. With a wheelbase a foot longer than that of a Porsche 356 but fitted with only two seats, the APAL GT offered very comfortable accommodation for driver and passenger, plus a great deal of interior luggage space. Their light weight and low center of gravity contributed to excellent handling as well.

While APAL founder Edmond Pery is best known for his dune buggies and replica Speedsters, the Belgian concern turned out about 150 of these attractive little coupes between 1961 and 1965, of which some 30 or so examples were fitted with Porsche 356 engines, transaxles, brakes, wheels, seats, instrumentation, and interior trim. Given that they weighed barely 1,400 pounds, much less than a 356 B coupe, the Porsche-powered APAL GT proved very effective in racing, hillclimbs, and rallies, including the famed Liège-Sofia-Liège contest.

The APAL factory in Liège suffered a major fire in 1969, and the company almost went out of business. However, Pery and his employees rebuilt the factory and went back to building dune buggies, which had proven very popular in Europe.

The car offered here is believed to have been delivered through Bendheuer of Cologne (“Hersteller Bendheuer” appears on the body plate) for racing in Germany. It passed through the hands of an owner in South Carolina before being acquired by noted Tennessee Porsche enthusiast Tom Trabue, in whose care it remained for some 30 years. More recently, it was acquired by a noted Southern California Porsche vintage racer, who embarked on a thorough mechanical and cosmetic restoration. The owner unveiled this rarely-seen and unusual automobile at the 2013 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, where its good looks attracted a great deal of attention. The rear-mounted engine is a 1600 Porsche Normal powerplant. The case number dates from 1957 production, but Mr. Trabue says it is very likely that Pery used whatever Porsche engines were available when he built his cars. The engine feeds a Porsche four-speed transaxle. Brakes are large Porsche drums at all four corners, which are very effective in such a light chassis.

This head-turning APAL GT, finished in red with red-piped black upholstery, would certainly be a unique entry for rallies, tours, and vintage races anywhere around the world

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