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The 2016 Porsche 991 R

Historic date Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Limited special model with naturally aspirated engine and manual transmission

Wolf in sheep's clothing – the new Porsche 911 R

Stuttgart. With its new 911 R, Porsche is unveiling a puristic sports car in classical design at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show. Its 368 kW (500 hp) four-litre naturally aspirated flat engine and six-speed sports transmission places the 911 R firmly in the tradition of its historic role model: a road-homologated racing car from 1967. Produced as part of a limited production series, the 911 R (R for Racing) performed in rallies, in the Targa Florio and in world record runs. Like its legendary predecessor, the new 911 R relies on systematic lightweight construction, maximum performance and an unfiltered driving experience: this special limited-edition model of 991 units has an overall weight of 1,370 kilograms and is currently the lightest version of the 911. With the high-revving six-cylinder naturally aspirated engine and manual sports transmission, Porsche is once again displaying its commitment to especially emotional high-performance sports cars. Developed in the motorsport workshop, the 911 R extends the spectrum of high-performance naturally aspirated engines alongside the motor racing models 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS.

At work in the rear of the 911 R is the six-cylinder flat engine with a displacement of four litres, familiar from the 911 GT3 RS. The racing engine delivers 500 hp at 8,250 rpm and generates 460 Nm at a speed of 6,250 rpm. From a standing start, the rear-engined car breaks through the 100 km/h barrier in 3.8 seconds. In keeping with the puristic character of the vehicle, the 911 with its lightweight design is available exclusively with a six-speed sports transmission. Short gearshift travel underlines the active driving experience. The forward thrust of the 911 R continues to a speed of 323 km/h. Combined fuel consumption in the NEDC is 13.3 l/100 km.

A thoroughbred driving machine: technology from the race track

The 911 R could almost have been made for tight corners. The specially tuned standard rear-axle steering guarantees especially direct turn-in characteristics and precise handling while maintaining high stability. The mechanical rear differential lock builds up maximum traction. Ensuring the greatest possible deceleration is the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) as a standard feature. It measures a generous 410 millimetres on the front axle and 390 millimetres on the rear. Ultra High Performance Tyres of size 245 millimetres at the front and 305 millimetres at the rear are responsible for contact to the road. They are mounted on forged 20-inch lightweight wheels with central lock in matt aluminium.

Motorsport development has specially adapted the control systems of the Porsche Stability Management (PSM) for the 911 R. A double-declutch function activated by pressing a button for perfect gearshifts when changing down is also part of the repertoire of the 911 R as is the optional single-mass flywheel. The result is a significant improvement in spontaneity and high-revving dynamics of the engine. For unrestricted practicality in everyday use, a lift system can also be ordered: it raises ground clearance of the front axle by approximately 30 millimetres at the touch of a button.

With its overall weight of 1,370 kilograms, the 911 R undercuts the 911 GT3 RS by 50 kilograms. Bonnet and wings are made of carbon and the roof of magnesium. This reduces the centre of gravity for the vehicle. Rear windscreen and rear side windows consist of lightweight plastic. Additional factors are the reduced insulation in the interior and the omission of a rear bench seat. The optional air conditioning system and the radio including audio system also fell victim to the slimming cure.

Wolf in sheep's clothing: classic 911 look with GT motor racing technology

From the exterior, the 911 R gives a reserved impression. At first sight, the body resembles that of the Carrera. Merely the nose and rear body familiar from the 911 GT3 hint at the birthplace of the 911 R: namely the motorsport department in Flacht. In technical terms therefore, the 911 R has a lot to show under the bonnet: the drive technology comes from the 911 GT3 RS. All the lightweight components of the body and the complete chassis originate from the 911 GT3. However, with a view to road use, the body manages without the fixed rear wing. Instead, a retractable rear spoiler, familiar from the Carrera models, and a rear underbody diffuser specific to R models provide the necessary downforce. Front and rear apron come from the 911 GT3. The sports exhaust system consists of the lightweight construction material titanium. A redesigned spoiler lip is installed at the front. Porsche logos on the sides of the vehicle and continuous colour stripes in red or green over the entire mid-section of the vehicle show the relationship to its legendary predecessor.

The driver sits in a carbon full bucket seat with fabric centre panels in Pepita tartan design, recalling the first 911 in the 1960s. An “R-specific” GT sport steering wheel with a diameter of 360 millimetres receives steering commands from the driver. Gearshifts take place in traditional manner via an R-specific short gearshift lever and the clutch pedal. Carbon trim strips in the interior with an embedded aluminium badge on the front passenger's side indicate the limited number of the 911 R. A typical feature of GT vehicles are the pull straps as door openers.

Launch and prices

Orders for the 911 R can be placed as of now. In Germany it will be in the showrooms as of May. Inclusive of value added tax and country-specific features, it costs 189,544 euros.

Porsche 911 R: urban fuel consumption 20.1 l/100 km; extra-urban 9.3 l/100 km; combined 13.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 308 g/km; efficiency class (Germany): G.

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Historic date Monday, December 28, 1953

A Spectacular Example of Italian Automotive Artistry in the 1950s, this is one of 114 8Vs and One of Only Nine Vignale Coupes Built. Beautifully Restored in Original Colors to Concours Standards. The car was first in Class at Pebble Beach and Best in Class at Amelia Island. December 2015 and January 2016 the car is on display at Autoworld's Exposition "Italian Car Passion"

Chassis: 106*000051

Like most of Vignale's creations of the day, this 8V Coupe was styled by the great Giovanni Michelotti. Believed to have been completed halfway through 1953, the earliest history of this car is still a mystery. What is known, is that it was brought to California in 1957, most likely from France. It was soon after acquired by collector Richard Egizi, who would go on to own the car until 1992. Among the subsequent custodians was Bruce Milner, who had the car comprehensively restored by Auto Restorations in New Zeeland. During the restoration, the original colours were discovered and formed a guide for the eventual finish of the Vignale Coupe. In 2002, it was awarded 'Best in Class' at Pebble Beach, beating seven others to the spoils in a dedicated 8V class. Over a decade later, it also won its class at The Quail, a Motorsports Gathering.

1,996 CC OHV 70˚ V-8 Engine

Twin Weber 36 DCZ3 Carburetors

110 HP at 6,000 RPM

5-Speed Manual Gearbox

4-Wheel Hydraulic Drum Brakes

4-Wheel Independent-Wishbone Suspension with Coil Springs

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Historic date Monday, December 28, 1953

This Belgian Registered1900 Super Berlina was on display at Autoworld in December 2015 and January 2016. This is what was written about the car in the prospectus:

The 1900 Berlina was the first Alfa with a monocoque body, the first Alfa to be produced on an assembly line and the first Alfa with the steering wheel at the “correct” side. This switch to the left is far more crucial than it appears. In Italy at the time the posh cars had the steering wheel fitted at the aristocrated right. It is worth stating that Alfa Romeo truly changed track and opted to fully focus on the common man.

Before the war Alfa Romeo was just as sporty as Bugatti and just as exclusive as Rolls Royce. Unfortunately it became impossible to retain that unique position. However a sporty heart was still beating under the bonnet of a 1900. Alfa even named it “the first family car that wins races”. Following its launch in 1950 in Paris it was to remain in production for nine long years, whereby an endless string of variants were put in the pipeline.

This car is a 1957 version, with 90 BHP coming from the 4 cylinder 1975 cc, good for 160 km/h.


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Historic date Monday, September 21, 2015

Actually, this is the story and 16 great pictures about a little engine getting on a big plane to go conquer the California coastline. Here's how Lufthansa loaded a Porsche 906 at Frankfurt Airport into a Boeing 747-8 headed for Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on friday 19th septembre 2015.

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Historic date Friday, September 13, 1957

The Autobianchi Bianchina is a minicar produced by the Italian automaker Autobianchi, based on the Fiat 500. It was available in various configurations: Berlina (saloon), Cabriolet (roadster), Trasformabile (convertible), Panoramica (station wagon), and Furgoncino (van). The car was presented to the public on 16 September 1957 at the Museum of Science and Technology in Milan.

Initially, the car was equipped with the smallest Fiat engine, air-cooled 2 cilinder 479 cc producing 15 hp (11 kW). In 1959, the engine power was increased to 17 hp (13 kW) and in 1960, the cabriolet version was launched.

In the same year, the Trasformabile, whose engine cylinder capacity was increased to 499 cc (18 hp), was made available in a Special version with bicolour paint and an engine enhanced to 21 hp (16 kW). Transformabile featured fixed B-pillar and partial roof, as the rest of the opening was covered with foldable fabric hood. Cabriolet version had no B-pillar. Also this was the only version to feature suicide doors. In 1962,the Trasformabile was replaced by a 4-seat saloon. The engine and chassis were the same as in the Trasformabile.

The Bianchina was designed by Luigi Rapi. This car is the 21 hp version with Vin number #032091

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Historic date Sunday, September 13, 2015
The 1952 fixed head Coupé was the car of Ella Melrose, the girlfriend of Mike Hawthorn, the famous racing driver. The current lady owner uses the car since 1996 as her daily driver.
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