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Historic date Monday, April 25, 2016

Four-cylinder turbo for power when cornering – the new Porsche 718 Cayman

Stuttgart. The fourth, redeveloped generation of the mid-engine sport coupé has a more striking, athletic and efficient appearance. Just a few weeks after the debut of the new 718 Boxster, the new 718 Cayman is extending the new model series. For the first time, the hard-top is priced below the roadster – in a similar way to the 911 models. 718 Cayman pricing starts at 51,623 euros in Germany, and the 718 Cayman S costs from 64,118 euros, each including VAT and country-specific features.

The same new four-cylinder flat engines with turbocharging as in the 718 Boxster are being deployed in the 718 Cayman. As a result, coupé and roadster have an identical engine output for the first time. The entry-level version starts with 220 kW (300 hp) from two litres of displacement. The S model delivers 257 kW (350 hp) with a displacement of 2.5 litres. This represents 18 kW (25 hp) more power compared to the predecessor models with an NEDC fuel consumption of 8.1 to 5.7 litres per 100 kilometres.

The tremendous torque of the new engines in the 718 Cayman promises driving fun and agility even at low revs. The two-litre engine of the 718 Cayman achieves a torque of up to 380 Nm (plus 90 Nm), which is available between 1,950 rpm and 4,500 rpm. The 2.5-litre engine of the 718 Cayman S features a turbocharger with variable turbine geometry (VTG), a technology hitherto used exclusively in the 911 Turbo. In the 718 Cayman S, the VTG charger additionally has a wastegate for the first time. It delivers up to 420 Nm (an extra 50 Nm) to the crankshaft at engine speeds between 1,900 and 4,500 rpm. For the driver this means even better torque in all engine speed ranges. The 718 Cayman with PDK and optional Sport Chrono Package sprints from zero to 100 km/h in 4.7 seconds. The 718 Cayman S completes this sprint in 4.2 seconds. The top speed of the 718 Cayman is 275 km/h, and the 718 Cayman S can reach a speed of 285 km/h.

New chassis tuning for greater precision and more lateral stability

In terms of their driving dynamics, the new 718 Cayman models follow in the tracks of the classic 718 cars. Thanks to their outstanding agility, the historic mid-engine sports cars won numerous races in the 1950s and 1960s such as the Targa Florio and Le Mans. Lateral rigidity and wheel tracking have been improved in the completely retuned chassis of the 718 Cayman; springs and stabilisers have been designed to be firmer and the tuning of the shock absorbers has been revised. The steering, which has been configured to be ten per cent more direct, enhances agility and driving fun. The rear wheels, which are one-half of an inch wider, in combination with the redeveloped tyres result in an increased lateral force potential and hence in greater cornering stability.

Driving dynamics options such as the Sport Chrono Package and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) allow the sporty character of the 718 Cayman to be further customised. Another available option is PASM with a ten-millimetre lowering of the ride height and additionally in the S model PASM sport suspension with a 20-millimetre lowering of the ride height for the first time. As in the other Porsche sports cars, the Sport Chrono Package can be adjusted via the programme switch on the steering wheel. Supplementing the previous settings of “Normal”, “Sport” and “Sport Plus” is the “Individual” programme, which is able to call up previously programmed individual settings for various systems.

On account of the car’s greater driving performance capabilities, stronger brake systems are now in use with 330-millimetre brake discs in front and 299-millimetre discs at the rear. The 718 Cayman now has the brake system that was previously used in the Cayman S. The 718 Cayman S, on the other hand, uses the four-piston callipers of the 911 Carrera combined with six-millimetre thicker brake discs.

Distinctive design for a more muscular appearance

The new 718 Cayman has been further developed as comprehensively in its design as in its technology. The taut proportions, prominent air intakes at the front and sides and low side profile underscore the boost in dynamics. The nose has a much sharper profile, which gives the front end a wider and more masculine appearance. The ultra-slim front lights above the air intakes, which contain the parking lights and indicators, further reinforce this impression. Rounding off the front end of the 718 Cayman, are the significantly larger cooling air intakes and bi-xenon headlights in their new design with integrated LED daytime running lights. LED headlights with four-point daytime running lights are available as a new option. Viewed from the side, the new sport coupé reveals its striking wings and side sills. The redesigned rear has a much wider look due to the accent strip in high-gloss black with integrated Porsche badge between the tail lights. The tail lights have been completely redesigned and are distinguished by the three-dimensional technology and four brake spots that appear to float freely.

Redesigned interior and PCM as standard

Inside, revisions are visible for both the 718 Cayman and the 718 Boxster. The upper part of the dash panel including air vents is new. The new sport steering wheel in the 918 Spyder design as well as the extensive connectivity options have now been added to the 718 cockpit along with the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) as a standard feature. Mobile phone preparation, audio interfaces and the 150-watt Sound Package Plus are all part of this standard. Options are available to extend the PCM. The Connect module, for example, includes special extensions for smartphones, such as the USB port, Apple CarPlay and Porsche Car Connect. Another available option is the navigation module with voice control, which makes it easy to input driving destinations. If the Connect Plus module is selected, this can be extended with real-time traffic information. Drivers can also make use of additional comprehensive services via their smartphone, which include the Porsche Connect App and Porsche Car Connect App.

The 718 Cayman and 718 Cayman S can be ordered now. The European market launch begins at the end of September 2016.

718 Cayman: combined fuel consumption 7.4 – 6.9 l/100 km, urban 9.9 – 9.0 l/100 km, extra-urban 6.0 – 5.7 l/100 km;

CO2 emissions 168 - 158 g/km; efficiency class (Germany): E-D.

718 Cayman S: combined fuel consumption 8.1 – 7.3 l/100 km, urban 10.7 – 9.5 l/100 km, extra-urban 6.5 – 6.0 l/100 km;

CO2 emissions 184 - 167 g/km; efficiency class (Germany): F-E.

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Historic date Sunday, April 17, 2016

Nice movie about one of the Group B cult cars.

Presenatation of the Peugeot 205 T16 in 1983

To homologate the 205 T16 ("Turbo 16" in France) Group B rally car, Peugeot had to produce 200 road-going examples. According to the Group B regulations, these had to be based on a current production road car. Peugeot decided to base the Group B rally car on the two door version of the 205. The engine was based on the cast iron block of the Diesel version of the then new XU engine family, albeit with a specially developed 16-valve head. The gearbox came from the Citroen SM but was mounted transversely. The car had all wheel drive. The body was built by Heuliez, where standard three door bodyshells from the production line were delivered and heavily modified. Heuliez cut off the complete rear of the car and welded in a transverse firewall between the B-posts. The rear frame was then built in a mixture of sheet steel profiles and tubes. The front was modified in a similar way with a tube frame carrying the front suspension. The completed bodies were delivered to Simca (Talbot) for the 200-series production cars and to Peugeot Talbot Sport for the competition versions. All street versions (VINs P1 to P200) were left hand drive and identically kitted out in dark grey colour, except the first (VIN P1) that was painted white and carried all the competition cars’ decoration for demonstration purposes. The competition cars of the first evolution series (VIN C1 to C20) were built at the sport department Peugeot Talbot Sport and presented to the public at the same day as the standard street version. Later competition vehicles of the Evolution 2 series (VIN C201 to C220) were built differently as the rear spaceframe had no more sheet steel profiles in it but was completely made from tubes only.

Apart from the appearance, the road variants had practically nothing in common with the regular production model and shared the transverse mid-engine, four-wheel drive layout of the rally car, but had less than half the power; at around 200 PS (147 kW; 197 hp). The T was for Turbo; the 16 stands for 16 valves.[12] Outwardly similar to a normal 205, the T16 had wider wheel arches, and the whole rear section lifted up to give access to the engine. Underneath, the complex drivetrain from the rally car was kept to abide by the Group B rules In addition to the Group B model, the lesser 205 GTI was also FIA approved for competition in the Group N and Group A categories.

Peugeot Talbot Sport's factory 205 T16s under Jean Todt were the most successful cars to compete in the last two years of the World Rally Championship's Group B era, winning the 1985 and 1986 Constructors' and Drivers' titles with Timo Salonen and Juha Kankkunen respectively against such notable competition from Audi, Lancia and Ford, with an Evolution 2 model being introduced for the latter of those two seasons

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Historic date Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Stuttgart/Essen. To mark the opening of Techno Classica in Essen, Porsche Classic presents a restored 911 2.5 S/T with an eventful motorsport history. The class winner at Le Mans in 1972 has been restored by the Porsche Classic experts over the past two years and will now be presented for the first time at the fair.

Alexander Fabig, head of Porsche Classic at Porsche AG, recalls the state that the car was originally in: “The 911 2.5 S/T was rediscovered a few years ago by a collector in the USA – and it was in a rally dilapidated condition. Our experts have done an excellent job at restoring the sports car to the highest standards.” The find is a real rarity: only 24 of this racing car, based on the 911 2.4 S Coupé, were ever built. “We are thrilled about the confidence this customer placed in us with this restoration job. This project is unparalleled and of great historical significance”, Fabig continues.

The 911 2.5 S/T was developed for customer sporting use in group 3 (series GT vehicles) and group 4 (modified GT vehicles) and was available in limited numbers from the sports division of what was then Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche KG for 49,680 Marks from the end of 1971 onwards. The 911 2.5 S was a works-modified version of the standard 911 2.4 S Coupé designed for use on racing circuits such as the Targa Florio or Le Mans as well as in rally racing, costing an extra 19,000 Marks, modified strictly in accordance with the international sporting regulations.

Ordered from the sports division of Porsche by the US racing driver Michael “Mike” Keyser in November 1971, the 911 2.5 S/T saw action at several races in the USA and at the endurance world championship during the 1972 season. One of the drivers back then was Jürgen Barth, a Porsche factory driver and an employee of the sports division of Porsche. The overall winner of the Le Mans 24 Hours race in 1977 can still vividly remember those days even now, 44 years later: “Mike Keyser had invited me to Sebring and we planned to drive the full 1972 endurance championship. Mike had even hired a small TV team to accompany us through the season.”

In the 1972 season, Jürgen Barth and the 911 2.5 S/T raced in the Daytona 6 Hours and the Sebring 12 Hours in Florida, followed by the Targa Florio as well as the 1000-km race on the Nürburgring together with Mike Keyser. Together with Sylvain Garant from Switzerland, Keyser and Barth finally took up the gauntlet of the season’s highlight – the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Not only did the trio, under the banner of the team Louis Mezanarie, take the class victory for GT cars up to 3 litres, but also clinched a formidable 13th place overall.

All these years later, the restoration is posing a real challenge for the Porsche Classic experts – especially when it comes to the bodywork. As soon as the car had arrived at the workshop the experts discovered that not only had the 911 been converted to what was later dubbed the 'G-model', but it had also suffered accident damage, which had been bent back into shape unprofessionally. In addition to deformation in the tunnel as well as on the side rails, corrosion had done serious damage, in particular in the wheel housing panels, the tunnel and the roof. The roof, which had been deformed beyond repair, suggested that children had used the car as a welcome playmate for a considerable length of time, making the repairs to the bodywork particularly complex, which included the challenging conversion and reconstruction of the flared wing extensions, partly done by hand. The 911 2.5 S/T was given a new roof as well as new tank bottom.

After the extensive metalwork had been completed, the body of the 911 2.5 S/T was coated by cathodic dip painting (CDP) to protect it long-term against corrosion according to the highest technological standards of series production. This was done by putting the restored body through the current series production process at Porsche to give it perfect protection against corrosion. This was then followed by body finishing and painting in the original light yellow colour, code 117.

Motor racing, in particular the Le Mans 24 Hours race, is of great significance to Porsche. Over 800 Porsche vehicles have taken part since the first race took place in 1951, with 103 of them taking a class victory and 17 overall victories at the circuit on the river Sarthe, Porsche is the most successful brand there by far. After winning last year, Porsche is all set to take part in the 84th Le Mans 24 Hours race on June 18 and 19 this year.

Traditionally for Porsche, a race like the 24 Hours of Le Mans is not only about competing at the highest level. Rather, the race track is more of a testing ground for new technologies. The development of successful race cars like the 919 Hybrid and the 911 RSR as well as being put to the test under tough racing conditions offer critical insights that can be incorporated in to the design of future generations of production models. This type of technology transfer from race car to standard vehicle as the driving force behind Porsche’s motorsport involvement was already in Ferry Porsche’s mind when he said: “Technical progress is unthinkable without sport. It is the vector for development. The extreme demands we face on the race track very quickly highlight any weak points and encourage our engineers to look for new and better solutions.”

Seen in this light, the 911 2.5 S/T restored by Porsche Classic down to the last detail can be see from a historical point of view, too. It was the direct predecessor and the immediate technical precursor for the 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR, which saw the abbreviation “RSR”, which stands for RennSport Rennwagen (literally: racing sport racing car) become the epitome for the highest stage of development of the 911 racing cars from 1973 onwards and heralded the continuous technological improvement of the production 911, in keeping with Ferry Porsche’s philosophy.

Having now been on the market for over five decades, the 911 – which is now in its seventh generation – stands for the Porsche brand like no other series. Porsche Classic is now already taking care of the fifth generation of this iconic sports car (Type 996). The Classic experts cater for all vehicle model series whose production was phased out at least ten years ago, in order to continue to guarantee smooth service and assure long life and value preservation for classic Porsche vehicles.

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Historic date Friday, March 18, 2016

kan iemand mij helpen met het bouwen van een 911 speedster club sport

By ronny
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The 2016 Porsche 991 R

Historic date Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Limited special model with naturally aspirated engine and manual transmission

Wolf in sheep's clothing – the new Porsche 911 R

Stuttgart. With its new 911 R, Porsche is unveiling a puristic sports car in classical design at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show. Its 368 kW (500 hp) four-litre naturally aspirated flat engine and six-speed sports transmission places the 911 R firmly in the tradition of its historic role model: a road-homologated racing car from 1967. Produced as part of a limited production series, the 911 R (R for Racing) performed in rallies, in the Targa Florio and in world record runs. Like its legendary predecessor, the new 911 R relies on systematic lightweight construction, maximum performance and an unfiltered driving experience: this special limited-edition model of 991 units has an overall weight of 1,370 kilograms and is currently the lightest version of the 911. With the high-revving six-cylinder naturally aspirated engine and manual sports transmission, Porsche is once again displaying its commitment to especially emotional high-performance sports cars. Developed in the motorsport workshop, the 911 R extends the spectrum of high-performance naturally aspirated engines alongside the motor racing models 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS.

At work in the rear of the 911 R is the six-cylinder flat engine with a displacement of four litres, familiar from the 911 GT3 RS. The racing engine delivers 500 hp at 8,250 rpm and generates 460 Nm at a speed of 6,250 rpm. From a standing start, the rear-engined car breaks through the 100 km/h barrier in 3.8 seconds. In keeping with the puristic character of the vehicle, the 911 with its lightweight design is available exclusively with a six-speed sports transmission. Short gearshift travel underlines the active driving experience. The forward thrust of the 911 R continues to a speed of 323 km/h. Combined fuel consumption in the NEDC is 13.3 l/100 km.

A thoroughbred driving machine: technology from the race track

The 911 R could almost have been made for tight corners. The specially tuned standard rear-axle steering guarantees especially direct turn-in characteristics and precise handling while maintaining high stability. The mechanical rear differential lock builds up maximum traction. Ensuring the greatest possible deceleration is the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) as a standard feature. It measures a generous 410 millimetres on the front axle and 390 millimetres on the rear. Ultra High Performance Tyres of size 245 millimetres at the front and 305 millimetres at the rear are responsible for contact to the road. They are mounted on forged 20-inch lightweight wheels with central lock in matt aluminium.

Motorsport development has specially adapted the control systems of the Porsche Stability Management (PSM) for the 911 R. A double-declutch function activated by pressing a button for perfect gearshifts when changing down is also part of the repertoire of the 911 R as is the optional single-mass flywheel. The result is a significant improvement in spontaneity and high-revving dynamics of the engine. For unrestricted practicality in everyday use, a lift system can also be ordered: it raises ground clearance of the front axle by approximately 30 millimetres at the touch of a button.

With its overall weight of 1,370 kilograms, the 911 R undercuts the 911 GT3 RS by 50 kilograms. Bonnet and wings are made of carbon and the roof of magnesium. This reduces the centre of gravity for the vehicle. Rear windscreen and rear side windows consist of lightweight plastic. Additional factors are the reduced insulation in the interior and the omission of a rear bench seat. The optional air conditioning system and the radio including audio system also fell victim to the slimming cure.

Wolf in sheep's clothing: classic 911 look with GT motor racing technology

From the exterior, the 911 R gives a reserved impression. At first sight, the body resembles that of the Carrera. Merely the nose and rear body familiar from the 911 GT3 hint at the birthplace of the 911 R: namely the motorsport department in Flacht. In technical terms therefore, the 911 R has a lot to show under the bonnet: the drive technology comes from the 911 GT3 RS. All the lightweight components of the body and the complete chassis originate from the 911 GT3. However, with a view to road use, the body manages without the fixed rear wing. Instead, a retractable rear spoiler, familiar from the Carrera models, and a rear underbody diffuser specific to R models provide the necessary downforce. Front and rear apron come from the 911 GT3. The sports exhaust system consists of the lightweight construction material titanium. A redesigned spoiler lip is installed at the front. Porsche logos on the sides of the vehicle and continuous colour stripes in red or green over the entire mid-section of the vehicle show the relationship to its legendary predecessor.

The driver sits in a carbon full bucket seat with fabric centre panels in Pepita tartan design, recalling the first 911 in the 1960s. An “R-specific” GT sport steering wheel with a diameter of 360 millimetres receives steering commands from the driver. Gearshifts take place in traditional manner via an R-specific short gearshift lever and the clutch pedal. Carbon trim strips in the interior with an embedded aluminium badge on the front passenger's side indicate the limited number of the 911 R. A typical feature of GT vehicles are the pull straps as door openers.

Launch and prices

Orders for the 911 R can be placed as of now. In Germany it will be in the showrooms as of May. Inclusive of value added tax and country-specific features, it costs 189,544 euros.

Porsche 911 R: urban fuel consumption 20.1 l/100 km; extra-urban 9.3 l/100 km; combined 13.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 308 g/km; efficiency class (Germany): G.

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Historic date Sunday, January 31, 2016

The behind the scenes look at the brand new Porsche Panamera Turbo Camera Crane car by Chase Car Inc.

In this behind the scenes featurette, we go through how we conceived the car, its unique features, what it can do.

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